Pastel Pick of the Week | IAPS (and You) at Salmagundi

What’s on your easel? Is it new and bold? Inventive and inspired? Flat out stunning? And how would it look framed and hanging in a show at the Salmagundi Club? Don’t miss your chance to make it happen! The International Association of Pastel Societies (IAPS) has recently announced the Call for Entries for their 28th IAPS Juried Exhibition, which will be hosted at the historic New York City club this June (6th to 17th).

Visit the IAPS website to find the prospectus with all the information and criteria you need to know; plus the show schedule; the lineup of prizes; and information about the jurors of selection Richard McKinley, Chris Ivers, and myself; and the Juror of Awards Jimmy Wright.

Is the piece on your easel not quite there yet? No worries. The entry deadline is March 20, 2016, so there is still time for masterpiece-making!

tom-christopher-pastel

Tom Christopher earned the Prix de Pastel for his piece, Hidden Acres, at IAPS’ 26th Annual Juried Exhibition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MORE RESOURCES FOR ARTISTS

pastel-painting-with-the-masters

PASTEL PAINTING WITH THE MASTERS! This eMag featuring pastel insights and instruction from celebrated artists Duane Wakeham, Jimmy Wright and William Truman Hosner is available for download at the North Light Shop!

You can have an entire of year’s worth of Pastel Journal articles at your fingertips. Add the 2015 Pastel Journal Annual CD to your pastel library!

Subscribe to Pastel Journal magazine

Watch pastel art workshops on demand at ArtistsNetwork.TV

 

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Portrait Drawing: Capturing Expression with Mario Robinson | Webinar Recording

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In this free webinar recording, you’ll learn how to create realistic portraits with Mario Robinson!

Mario discusses how to map out the features of the subject, how to use the crosshatching technique, how to shade, add highlights and more! This webinar concludes with a live Q&A.


About Mario Robinson
Mario A. Robinson was born in Altus, Oklahoma, where he resided with his family before relocating to New Jersey at the age of twelve. His artistic gift was discovered by a fifth grade teacher who sparked a creative explosion that led to study at the prestigious Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. Mario’s work has a timeless and universal quality and exhibits a turn-of-the-century aesthetic. A brand ambassador for Winsor & Newton and a member of several art societies, including Signature status in the Pastel Society of America, you can find his work featured in several publications, such as The Artist’s Magazine, The Pastel Journal, and Watercolor Artist. Learn more at MarioARobinson.com.

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Drawing Basics: What Masters DO that Amateurs DON’T

It’s fun to see a real life transformation, when a mediocre artist becomes a master . . . especially when that happens really fast. In my home study art courses, I share a few common mistakes beginning artists have made and how you can avoid them.

[Take a home study course with Sandra Angelo here!]

Drawing Basics: What Masters DO that Amateurs DON’T

Carol Leather adores her granddaughter and wanted to freeze that young energetic spirit. But when she created a portrait of six-year-old Beth, it laid lifeless on the page, flat, out of proportion and missing the personality that this perky child exudes. It didn’t even look like a little girl; Carol had aged the portrait.

Drawing Basics with Sandra Angelo | ArtistsNetwork.com

Here are the common drawing mistakes Carol made that you might be making, too:

1. She put the eyes in the center of the face, which isn’t where eyes line up on a child’s face.
• As people age, eyes move to different positions.
• Carol’s drawing proportions were off, so the likeness eluded her.

2. Carol used just two pencils for the hair, instead of a wide range multifarious tones found in natural hair.
• Even blonde hair has super dark values.
• In her final portrait she used 12-18 pencils to create depth in hair.

3. She used just one pencil for the skin tones, which makes the face look flat.
• In her second portrait, she used 12-18 pencils to help the face take on dimension.

4. She used white drawing paper.
• It takes 200% longer to draw portraits on white and results tend to be wimpy.
• Your portrait paper needs to be in harmony with skin tones.
• Clothing needs to be in harmony with the paper.

5. Her photo reference didn’t capture the child’s personality.
• It’s tricky to get great shots of a moving target, like kids, but there are some really cool ways to make that happen!
• In my online art workshops, I share numerous secrets for shooting better reference photos for GREAT portraits.

Carol’s birthday arrived shortly after she completed her disappointing portrait, so she decided to splurge on one of my online art workshops. Discovering drawing basics and secrets that masters use to make portraits dynamic and energetic, her work began to take a quantum leap.

Drawing Basics with Sandra Angelo | ArtistsNetwork.com

‘Best Friends’ by Carol Leather

Here you can see Carol’s finished drawing after learning drawing basics through my art workshop. This drawing, Best Friends, sold before she even finished it.

Within six months in my portrait drawing program, her drawings were so astonishing that clients were clamoring for her portraits. Soon she had seven lucrative commissions. How did that happen so fast? She bypassed the agony of experimentation and learned secrets that masters already invented. Join us in my new webinar where I will teach you more of the secrets that helped Carol move from amateur to master in less than a year.
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In my online art workshops on drawing basics, we’ll take the pain out of portraiture!

About Sandra Angelo: Rhode Island School of Design Fellowship Award recipient, Sandra specializes in transforming absolute amateurs into amazing artists. Using Old Masters’ methods, Sandra’s super simple drawing lessons help you succeed . . . FAST.

Author of 50+ award-winning books, DVDs, Mail Order Courses & Online Workshops, Sandra coaches art apprentices all over the world, daily.

The post Drawing Basics: What Masters DO that Amateurs DON’T appeared first on Artist's Network.

Which is More Important: Value or Color?

Michael Reardon’s new book, Watercolor Techniques: Painting Light & Color in Landscapes & Cityscapes, teaches you how to make the most of both values and color, as well as capturing light, understanding perspective, and more. Discover step-by-step watercolor painting demonstrations that will help you make the most of your watercolor.

“The overriding theme of my artwork is the interaction between architecture and nature,” Michael says. “I’m ceaselessly fascinated by the interplay of architectural subjects in their natural milieu, be it city or countryside. In this book, I tap into my architectural background to give you tips, tricks and ideas for how to imbue your architectural watercolors with light and color.”

Scroll down for an exclusive excerpt that addresses color and value.

From “Watercolor Techniques”

Pre-order your copy of "Watercolor Techniques" by Michael Reardon

Gray scale version of ‘Bay Bridge Demolition’ by Michael Reardon, who says, “It can sometimes be useful to convert an image to gray scale to better discern the values independent of the color.” Pin this excerpt!

Value Versus Color by Michael Reardon

There’s an ongoing debate regarding the relative importance of value versus color in representational painting. Many artists feel that a value plan is all that’s necessary. For them, color is subsidiary to value. Colorists, on the other hand, feel that color is most critical and that patterns of color make a successful painting and that the value scale is intrinsic in the colors.

I’m not going to take sides in this debate, although I lean toward the values argument. The more I paint and teach, the more I believe a strong value plan is imperative. Even after decades of painting, I continue to do a pencil value study prior to every painting. With my values determined, I can then select the colors that I need to yield these values.

Many students, who are often reluctant to do a value study, get lost somewhere in the middle of a painting or have to go over previously painted areas because they didn’t know the values they wanted in advance. While color is crucial, following a solid value plan is a sure road map to a successful painting.

Value and light fit hand in glove. They are inseparable. Through the deft use of values, a painting can evince a strong sense of light, depicting a range of effects from harsh midday sun or soft and misty light. Value manipulation defines the atmosphere and feeling of light.

Pre-order your copy of "Watercolor Techniques" by Michael Reardon

Bay Bridge Demolition (watercolor, 18×11) by Michael Reardon

Bay Bridge Demolition (above; watercolor, 18×11) is composed almost entirely of areas of value, with a very limited color palette.

A sense of distance is created by the mid-values as the bridge recedes, transitioning to the lighter values of the distant bridge. When depicting three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional piece of paper, it is often necessary to exaggerate the depth. Values can help you do this.

Color plays a supporting role in the painting. For example, the muted color scheme evokes the feeling of early morning light. Changing the colors would change the feeling of the painting. Color modifies the mood, while values establish the composition.~Michael

Pre-order your copy of Watercolor Techniques: Painting Light & Color in Landscapes & Cityscapes today so that you can be among the first to learn Michael’s methods. As always, you’re invited to join the conversation and share your thoughts about value and color in the comments section below.

With warm regards,
Cherie

**Subscribe to the Artists Network newsletter for inspiration, instruction, and ideas, and score a free download on Watercolor Painting for Beginners: The Basics and More with watercolor techniques to learn!

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The Results Are In! Announcing the 7th Annual Watermedia Showcase Winners

Our annual watercolor art competition started with nearly 1,000 works. Entry by entry, our editorial staff whittled that number to 19 exceptional paintings. This year’s crop of winners and honorable mentions exemplifies incredible ingenuity, marvelous craftsmanship and masterful watercolor painting.

Watch the video to view the four top award-winning paintings, and find the list of winners below. You’ll see all of these paintings in the April 2016 issue of Watercolor Artist, available now in print and downloadable format at northlightshop.com, and on newsstands beginning February 16. Congratulations to our winners!

 

Best of Show

Hsiao-Hui Huang

 

2nd Place

Chien Chung-Wei

 

3rd Place

Peggi Habets

 

4th Place

Kathryn Keller Larkins

 

Honorable Mentions:

James Maria
Zhou Tianya
Anne Hightower-Patterson
William G. Hook
Yuki Hall
Graham Flatt
Andy Evansen
Jason Sacran
Anne Abgott
Xi Guo
Lisa Jefferson
Keiko Tanabe
Kathleen Conover
Peto Poghosyan
Elaine Daily-Birnbaum

 


MORE RESOURCES FOR WATERCOLOR ARTISTS
Subscribe to Watercolor Artist magazine

Get the 2015 Watercolor Artist CD archive

Watch watercolor art workshops on demand at ArtistsNetwork.TV

Get unlimited access to over 100 art instruction ebooks

Online seminars for fine artists

Sign up for your Artists Network email newsletter & receive a FREE download

The post The Results Are In! Announcing the 7th Annual Watermedia Showcase Winners appeared first on Artist's Network.

Texture and More Texture | Pastel Painting Close-Up with Jimmy Wright

Get an exclusive up-close look into the making of one of Jimmy Wright’s beautiful pastel paintings in this excerpt from The Artist’s Magazine. For a complete Q&A with the artist, plus a step-by-step pastel demonstration with Bill Hosner, a look inside a workshop with Duane Wakeham, and more, download the Pastel Painting with the Masters eMagazine for only $3.99.

The following “Close-Up” column gives you insider knowledge and an intimate view of a painting that is featured in The Artist’s Magazine. “Texture and More Texture” by Jimmy Wright originally appeared in the November 2011 issue.

Pastel painting | Jimmy Wright, ArtistsNetwork.com

For more about painting roses, read “Gather Ye Rosebuds,” in the November 2011 issue of The Artist’s Magazine.

I plied the canvas with Golden acrylic modeling paste; I wanted the surface to resemble an old plaster wall. Then I primed the surface with two coats of Golden acrylic gesso. Throughout Roses in a Jar (oil, 56×44), smooth texture plays against rough texture.

Originally entitled Roses on Earth, this picture’s predominant tone was burnt umber. I reshaped the composition when I painted over it.

Pastel painting | Jimmy Wright, ArtistsNetwork.com

 

A. To create the salmon-colored backdrop, I used a large, viscous amount of Vasari Classic artists’ oil. The paint was thick and stiff enough to retain the marks of the bristle bright brush.

B. The roses, painted with subtle changes of value, are a mixture of both smooth (B) and heavily impastoed forms (C). Though I frequently use small fan brushes, I use them in concert with other brushes.

D.  I pulled the salmon wall down in rapid brushstrokes from top to bottom, leaving a shallow band of umber as a shelf the jar can rest on.

E.  Here an area of the umber ground is left exposed. Shaped into a leaf, the form creates a positive shape carved with paint from a negative ground.

F. On the jar’s right side, the exposed umber ground becomes a thick (bottom) to thin (top) line of tension, pushing the jar away from the wall.

G. Taking a cue from Morandi and Matisse (who learned it from Cézanne), I made sure the space between table and wall was not defined by a straight edge. A series of uneven lines, created by butting together the wall and table in a jigsaw of planes, defines the vertical and horizontal planes.

H. The left side of the jar is rendered in warm values set against the cooler value of the pink wall, whereas the right side of the jar is painted in cool values set against the warmer tones of the pink wall.

Discover a variety of fine art magazines that have featured the pastel painting techniques of Jimmy Wright at North Light Shop.

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Playing Up the Drama in Watercolor Painting | Laurie Goldstein-Warren

“Like most of us, I was taught in watercolor painting to work light to dark,” says West Virginia artist Laurie Goldstein-Warren. “But by the time I’d crafted a well-drawn composition, meticulously saved my whites and established gorgeous lights, I was afraid of ruining all that good work with an errant stroke of arguably the scariest values on the scale. I’ve since learned that the best way to overcome this hindrance to a truly successful watercolor painting is to face my fears head-on and go straight in with the darkest darks.”

View a gallery of the artist’s paintings that resulted from using this technique below.

Read more about Laurie Goldstein-Warren in the April 2016 issue of Watercolor Artist, available now at northlightshop.com in print or as an instant download, and on newsstands February 17.

Or, for just a few more dollars, subscribe to Watercolor Artist and never miss an issue! Get your issues in the mail HERE or as digital downloads HERE.

 

Mardi Gras Beads (watercolor on paper) by Laurie Goldstein-Warren | watercolor-painting

Mardi Gras Beads (watercolor on paper) by Laurie Goldstein-Warren

 

Garlic and Lace (watercolor on paper) by Laurie Goldstein-Warren | watercolor painting

Garlic and Lace (watercolor on paper) by Laurie Goldstein-Warren

 

Sabrina (watercolor on paper) by Laurie Goldstein-Warren | watercolor painting

Sabrina (watercolor on paper) by Laurie Goldstein-Warren

 

L’Arc de Nuit (watercolor on paper) by Laurie Goldstein-Warren | watercolor painting

L’Arc de Nuit (watercolor on paper) by Laurie Goldstein-Warren

 

Maid of Orleans (watercolor on paper) by Laurie Goldstein-Warren | watercolor painting

Maid of Orleans (watercolor on paper) by Laurie Goldstein-Warren

 

 

 


MORE RESOURCES FOR WATERCOLOR ARTISTS
Subscribe to Watercolor Artist magazine

Get the 2015 Watercolor Artist CD archive

Watch watercolor art workshops on demand at ArtistsNetwork.TV

Get unlimited access to over 100 art instruction ebooks

Online seminars for fine artists

Sign up for your Artists Network email newsletter & receive a FREE download

The post Playing Up the Drama in Watercolor Painting | Laurie Goldstein-Warren appeared first on Artist's Network.