Switching Creative Gears | Brush Lettering With Watercolor | Comment and WIN!

If you’re reading this post, chances are pretty good that you already love watercolor painting or are embarking upon your journey. Admittedly, we adore the medium—a bold stroke of the brush to plant a tree in a landscape, transparent glazes, not painting an area to suggest its existence—it’s magic! But what about other ways to use watercolor? One idea currently on our minds (thanks, Pinterest and instagram) is brush lettering with watercolor.

hand lettering in watercolor | brush lettering

image courtesy of Cloth Paper Scissors

Not practical for your fine art purposes, you say? What about a birthday card for a loved one? A gift tag for a sold painting? This could be the activity that breaks you out of a creative slump and puts you back on the path to inspired watercolor painting. Our friends at Cloth Paper Scissors offer mark-making tips here and here (full disclosure: Cloth Paper Scissors is a sister publication).

So tell us: Are you into it? Comment below and tell us why or why not by September 9, and we’ll randomly select one respondent* to win a Pebeo watercolor set!

*US residents only, due to shipping costs and international contest rules and regulations.

 

 

The post Switching Creative Gears | Brush Lettering With Watercolor | Comment and WIN! appeared first on Artist's Network.

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Quick Draw | A Conversation With Alessandra Maria

Alessandra Maria is our New and Notable artist for the summer 2016 issue of Drawing. Maria’s work consists of charcoal, graphite and carbon pencils, gold leaf and black ink on coffee-stained paper, resulting in haunting portraits that posses a sculptural quality.

We had the pleasure of talking with Maria about her work, her inspirations and her advice for other artists. To learn more about the artist, visit her website. To see more from our summer issue, order or download a copy now, or subscribe to Drawing.

charcoal artist alessandra maria

Reverie I (2014; graphite, carbon pencil, gold leaf and black ink on coffee-stained paper, 9×9) by Alessandra Maria

Drawing (DR): Do you work from life, from photos, from imagination? Do you do much sketching or preliminary work before beginning a piece?

Alessandra Maria (AM): I often work from a combination of photos and imagination. I’ll make a photo collage before starting a piece to solidify what I’m seeing in my head; from there I work from the collage.

charcoal artist alessandra maria

Donum (2016; charcoal, carbon pencil, black ink and gold leaf on coffee stained paper, 24×26) by Alessandra Maria

DR: What do you like about the materials you work with? In particular, what’s the appeal of drawing on coffee-stained paper?

AM: I have always drawn, and am most comfortable with it as a medium. Charcoal has been a fun new challenge, and has opened up a world of possibilities. Because I’m accustomed to the precision of graphite, the messy freedom of charcoal has turned out to be liberating and exciting. I’m amazed by how much it’s enabled me to speed up my work!

I started drawing on coffee stained paper because I wanted the work to have a certain warmth and aged look about it. It helps give the work the feeling of an artifact.

charcoal_artist_alessandra_maria

Beatus (2015; graphite, black ink, gold leaf, carbon pencil on coffee stained paper, 22×17 1/2) by Alessandra Maria

DR. Are any master artists a particular inspiration to you?

AM: Da Vinci is an obvious choice, and from there I have quite a few classic favorites: Klimt; Botticelli; Bougueraeu; Beardsley; Andrew Wyeth; Hammershoi; in addition to other greats like Fuyuko Matsui, Kiefer, Saville, De Kooning and Mickalene Thomas. It runs a bit of a range.

charcoal_artist_alessandra_maria

Prayers (2014; graphite, black ink, gold leaf and carbon pencil on coffee stained paper, 10×12 1/5) by Alessandra Maria

DR: What advice would you have to someone looking to begin drawing the figure?

AM: Figure out where you want to be, and spend a good deal of time studying your idols intensely. Don’t get frustrated by mistakes; great artists are only masters because they have made thousands of terrible drawings. And rules don’t exist. Anybody who makes up a rule about how you should or shouldn’t draw is ridiculous. Draw with a mechanical pencil if that’s your jam, and screw anyone who tells you otherwise.

charcoal_artist_alessandra_maria

Jamila No. 2 (2015; graphite, black ink and carbon pencil on coffee stained paper, 18×24) by Alessandra Maria

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The post Quick Draw | A Conversation With Alessandra Maria appeared first on Artist's Network.

Quick Draw | A Conversation With Alessandra Maria

Alessandra Maria is our New and Notable artist for the summer 2016 issue of Drawing. Maria’s work consists of charcoal, graphite and carbon pencils, gold leaf and black ink on coffee-stained paper, resulting in haunting portraits that posses a sculptural quality.

We had the pleasure of talking with Maria about her work, her inspirations and her advice for other artists. To learn more about the artist, visit her website. To see more from our summer issue, order or download a copy now, or subscribe to Drawing.

charcoal artist alessandra maria

Reverie I (2014; graphite, carbon pencil, gold leaf and black ink on coffee-stained paper, 9×9) by Alessandra Maria

Drawing (DR): Do you work from life, from photos, from imagination? Do you do much sketching or preliminary work before beginning a piece?

Alessandra Maria (AM): I often work from a combination of photos and imagination. I’ll make a photo collage before starting a piece to solidify what I’m seeing in my head; from there I work from the collage.

charcoal artist alessandra maria

Donum (2016; charcoal, carbon pencil, black ink and gold leaf on coffee stained paper, 24×26) by Alessandra Maria

DR: What do you like about the materials you work with? In particular, what’s the appeal of drawing on coffee-stained paper?

AM: I have always drawn, and am most comfortable with it as a medium. Charcoal has been a fun new challenge, and has opened up a world of possibilities. Because I’m accustomed to the precision of graphite, the messy freedom of charcoal has turned out to be liberating and exciting. I’m amazed by how much it’s enabled me to speed up my work!

I started drawing on coffee stained paper because I wanted the work to have a certain warmth and aged look about it. It helps give the work the feeling of an artifact.

charcoal_artist_alessandra_maria

Beatus (2015; graphite, black ink, gold leaf, carbon pencil on coffee stained paper, 22×17 1/2) by Alessandra Maria

DR. Are any master artists a particular inspiration to you?

AM: Da Vinci is an obvious choice, and from there I have quite a few classic favorites: Klimt; Botticelli; Bougueraeu; Beardsley; Andrew Wyeth; Hammershoi; in addition to other greats like Fuyuko Matsui, Kiefer, Saville, De Kooning and Mickalene Thomas. It runs a bit of a range.

charcoal_artist_alessandra_maria

Prayers (2014; graphite, black ink, gold leaf and carbon pencil on coffee stained paper, 10×12 1/5) by Alessandra Maria

DR: What advice would you have to someone looking to begin drawing the figure?

AM: Figure out where you want to be, and spend a good deal of time studying your idols intensely. Don’t get frustrated by mistakes; great artists are only masters because they have made thousands of terrible drawings. And rules don’t exist. Anybody who makes up a rule about how you should or shouldn’t draw is ridiculous. Draw with a mechanical pencil if that’s your jam, and screw anyone who tells you otherwise.

charcoal_artist_alessandra_maria

Jamila No. 2 (2015; graphite, black ink and carbon pencil on coffee stained paper, 18×24) by Alessandra Maria

The post Quick Draw | A Conversation With Alessandra Maria appeared first on Artist's Network.

Lessons from the Students – A Conversation with Hank Washington

Acrylic artist Hank Washington has been creating art and teaching art for close to a lifetime. In the summer 2016 issue of Acrylic Artist we learn how this lifelong teacher has inspired countless students. We asked Washington to share his thoughts on the benefit of working with the beginner artist. Here is what he had to say.

 

acrylic painting Hank Washington

AA: As a teacher you are sharing your acquired knowledge. What key lesson do you recall from your early education?
HW: I received my formal education from Hampton Institute (Hampton University) more than 40 years ago. I remember being challenged to think differently about my personal art and its process. I was encouraged not to recreate the wheel but to create my own, in my style. I was encouraged to try new things, mediums, processes, styles and technologies.

AA: When you are teaching the basics to your students are you simply teaching or also refreshing your skills?
HW: One lends itself to the other—this is my joy for teaching art. Over the years I have learned much from my students that I could apply to my work. My job as teacher was simple—help students to problem solve artistically. The basics are nothing more than one’s foundation.

AA: What lessons about being an artist can we learn from spending time with younger (as in new-to-art) artists?
HW: For 15 years I taught a computer graphics class. All students knew I had a rule—if you were absent the day I taught a new lesson it was your responsibilities to find someone in class to guide you through the basics of the new lesson. Once the student could verbally discuss their level of understanding, I could then help the student with any problems. The result of this action was profound. The student that became the teacher showed a greater understanding and comprehension of the lesson. This is a lesson as old as time itself; you always get back more than you give! When we share our knowledge and gifts our rewards are great.

AA: How can going back to the basics, if even for only a class or seminar, help an experienced artist improve their technique?
HW: Fundamentals are the key to most success stories in life. Fundamentals are the building blocks for all we do artistically. I always enjoyed attending art conferences and listening to educators with different points of view whether I agreed or not with their opinions. My experience has taught me that every problem may have a number of solutions. We grow artistically if we allow ourselves to be open to new ideas, and revisit our basic skills.

 

To read the feature article on Hank Washington in Acrylic Artist, visit Norhtlightshop.com to order a copy of the Summer 2016 issue now.

The post Lessons from the Students – A Conversation with Hank Washington appeared first on Artist's Network.

Art Chat With Linda Fisler Featuring Carolyn Anderson

Join Linda Fisler as she welcomes Carolyn Anderson for the next Art Chat for a discussion that’s all about color! (Register here)

Is blue really a cool temperature? Can red be cool or warm? What about warm colors in shadow? What’s the science around pigments and light? How does it affect how we see and interpret color? These are just a few questions that Carolyn and Linda with explore.

Carolyn Anderson | ArtistsNetwork.com

Before the Race (12×12) by Carolyn Anderson

Date: Wednesday, August 24, 2016 (A recording will be available here after the webinar)

1:00pm-2:30pm EST
Cost: FREE

At the end of the Art Chat, there’ll be a live Q&A! If you can’t join us August 24, register now so you’ll receive a link to the recorded version.

Click here to register!

The post Art Chat With Linda Fisler Featuring Carolyn Anderson appeared first on Artist's Network.

Free Access to 600+ Art Video Workshops!

Enjoy a Free Trial at ArtistsNetwork.tv and learn from the world’s best artists in the comfort of your home with more than 600 art video workshops!

Starting today, take advantage of our FREE TRIAL at ArtistsNetwork.tv! You can view any and all of the video workshops through July 31, 2016. With more than 600 videos to choose from, we know you’ll find something you’ll enjoy!

Art workshops online | ArtistsNetwork.com

 

Simply click here to sign up for your FREE trial subscription to ArtistsNetworkTV, where you can choose a monthly or annual option. Your credit card will not be charged until the end of your free trial period (4 days of free access). So, if you cancel during your free trial, you won’t pay a thing.

If you want to continue viewing all of the great art video workshops at ArtistsNetworkTV after your free trial is over, you don’t need to do anything. You will automatically be renewed for the subscription of your choice, monthly or annual full access (subscription options are $19.99/month or $199.99 annual).

Your membership will continue to be renewed until you cancel. To cancel, just sign in to your My Account page at ArtistsNetwork.tv and select to stop your renewal.

Start watching free online art workshops here NOW!

*Offer ends 7/31/16. Available to new subscribers only

The post Free Access to 600+ Art Video Workshops! appeared first on Artist's Network.

Drawing Magazine, Summer 2016 Table of Contents

The summer 2016 issue of Drawing magazine is out now, and almost the entire magazine is devoted to one of our favorite subjects: artists’ sketchbooks.

No two artists use sketchbooks in exactly the same way, and in our special Sketchbook Insider feature we flip through the sketchbooks and journals of 11 artists and discover just how true that is. Our featured artists discuss how their books figure into their practice, list the materials they prefer for sketchbook drawing, and offer all sorts of sketching advice.

Other articles are devoted to drawing and painting while on vacation, the work of Cynthia Barlow Marrs, and using line to build a foundation for shading your figure drawings. The full list of articles is below. You can order your copy, download the issue, or subscribe to Drawing today. Enjoy!

DR_Cover_Sum16_med

Feature Articles

Sketchbook Insider
A special section exploring the impressive sketchbooks and journals of 11 artists. Featuring John Belardo, Thomas Cian, Simon Dinnerstein, Gary Faigin, Virginia Hein, James McElhinney, Elizabeth Osborne, John A. Parks, Matt Rota, Josef Rubinstein and Edwin Ushiro. By Austin R. Williams
Click here to see an expanded version of this article.

The Joys of Travel Sketching
How to create elegant artwork on location. By Cleveland Morris

Drawing at the Speed of Life
Cynthia Barlow Marrs finds inspiration in everyday places. By John A. Parks

Cynthia Barlow Marrs | Sketchbooks | Artist's Network

Monday at the Salon, by Cynthia Barlow Marrs, 2012, graphite, 8 1/4 x 10. Collection the artist.

Drawing Fundamentals: Lines That Speak Volumes, Part Two
Train yourself to break down the complex surface of the figure. By Jon deMartin

Columns

Material World: Sketchbooks Then and Now
By Sherry Camhy

Material World | Sketchbooks | Artist's Network

First Marks: Speed Sketching
By Margaret Davidson

New and Notable: Alessandra Maria
By Michael Woodson

Book Review: Richard Diebenkorn, The Sketchbooks Revealed
By Austin R. WIlliams

The post Drawing Magazine, Summer 2016 Table of Contents appeared first on Artist's Network.