No Shave November: Hirsute Art History Edition

Or, Should We Say Art Hair-Story Edition?

I must-ache you a question: Are you familiar with No Shave November, also known as Movember? It’s an entire month dedicated to not shaving your facial hair! So, because we are a community of artists and art lovers, we want to conclude this celebratory hairy month with an artful twist: art history meets No Shave November.

So sit back, relax and wax your staches. Here is a hair-raising roundup of famous artists and artworks that would make the creators of No Shave November proud. Enjoy!

Long Locks Leonardo

Leonardo da Vinci | Art History Staches | Art History Beards and Mustaches | No Shave November | Artists Network

Portrait of a Man in Red Chalk by Leonardo da Vinci, circa 1512

Presumed by most historians to be a self-portrait, the sketch above shows that Leonardo da Vinci had some seriously long locks going on — from the hairs of his chinny, chin, chin to the top of his head. It’s doubtful that this bad boy beard was grown in 30 days, but da Vinci’s facial hair definitely reveres the mission of No Shave November.

Striking Stache Salvador

Salvador Dali | | Art History Staches | Art History Beards and Mustaches | No Shave November | Artists Network

Salvador Dalí (1904 – 1989), New York, circa 1950s. (Photo by Weegee(Arthur Fellig)/International Center of Photography/Getty Images)

Salvador Dalí’s artwork is truly remarkable, but his mustache is also pretty “on point.” This surrealist knew how to make a statement, both on canvas and in life. His art and facial hair are both recognizable to this day.

Seductive Stache

Gustave Courbet | Art History Staches | Art History Beards and Mustaches | No Shave November | Artists Network

The Desperate Man by Gustave Courbet, oil, circa 1844–1845.

Gustave Courbet? More like, Gu-stache Courbet. We love the dramatic look, and we are sure the ladies dug it, too! If there were hipsters back in your day, Courbet, you probably led the pack.

Very Haired Hermit

Nesterov Mikhail | Art History Staches | Art History Beards and Mustaches | No Shave November | Artists Network

The Hermit by Mikhail Nesterov, circa 1889.

A stark landscape from Nesterov shows why anyone would want to grow their very own face scarf. The beard of this figure known only as the Hermit sure looks mighty warm. The added bonus of being a cold-blocker is a solid reason to take part in No Shave November.

‘Put a Fork in It’ Stache

Chase William Merritt | Art History Staches | Art History Beards and Mustaches | No Shave November | Artists Network

The Wounded Poacher by William Merritt Chase

Even with a head wound, William Merritt Chase’s poacher looks positively debonair. Gotta be the stache. There’s only one word to describe it: glorious. Can you picture him twisting the ends of that luxurious face pelt as someone refreshes his bandage? We can! Talk about a most manly stache perfect for Movember!

Stache d’Élégance

Peter Paul Rubens | Art History Staches | Art History Beards and Mustaches | No Shave November | Artists Network

Self-Portrait by Peter Paul Rubens, oil on canvas, circa 1639-1640. (Photo by Imagno/Getty Images)

From his beard to his expertly coiffed stache, Peter Paul Rubens knew how to dress to impress, and we aren’t talking just his wardrobe. He probably went through a container of wax a day to get that facial hair so pristine. And all we have to say is, worth it.

Feminine Facial Hair

Frida Kahlo | Art History Staches | Art History Beards and Mustaches | No Shave November | Artists Network

Frida Kahlo (1910-1954). (Photo by Bettmann/Getty Images)

Kudos to Frida Kahlo for making facial hair so gosh darn gorgeous! From her fabulous brow to her subtle stubble, she knew how to make female facial hair a work of art in its own right.

The Scrooge Stache

Chase William Merritt | Art History Staches | Art History Beards and Mustaches | No Shave November | Artists Network

Elderly Man Wearing Large White Collar by William Merritt Chase, circa 1875

William Merritt Chase clearly loved his staches, as you can see in The Wounded Poacher featured earlier in this lineup. Here’s another of the artist’s impressive beard depictions, this time of a grump of a man in a giant white collar. The mad gaze and mad locks come together for a terrifyingly impressive portrait.

Bearded Blanket of Emotion

Vincent van Gogh | Art History Staches | Art History Beards and Mustaches | No Shave November | Artists Network

Self-Portrait by Vincent van Gogh, oil on canvas, 1889. (Photo by VCG Wilson/Corbis via Getty Images)

Against his iconic brushstrokes and blue color palette, Vincent van Gogh’s bold beard positively glows. It even helps lead the viewer’s eye into the composition, as you take in the radiant beard and let your gaze move up to those intense blue eyes of the artist. Yowza.

High Class Upper Lip

John Singer Sargent | Art History Staches | Art History Beards and Mustaches | No Shave November | Artists Network

Gabriel Fauré by John Singer Sargent, oil on canvas, circa 1889.

What makes the subject for this painting appear more hoity-toity: his upward glance away from the viewer that just about screams snobby, or neck injury, or his furiously furry mustache? You be the judge.

The Monet Stache

Claude Monet | Art History Staches | Art History Beards and Mustaches | No Shave November | Artists Network

Claude Monet (1840-1926). Photograph by Nadar in 1899. (Photo by Bettmann/Getty Images)

But really, Monet is so much more than just a pretty mustache. Just take a quick gander at that killer beard! Picture him now, walking through his beloved Giverny gardens, dressed in an all-white, three-piece suit and sporting his signature green shades — oh, and of course meditatively combing his fingers through those lustrous locks of his chin puff.

Serious Stache

Edmund Tarbell | Art History Staches | Art History Beards and Mustaches | No Shave November | Artists Network

Portrait of Benjamin Rush by Edmund Tarbell

Have you ever seen a mustache look more unyielding? The subject’s firm expression is perfectly matched by his finely styled mustachio. The portrait screams “power,” so if you want to look as if you’re a key playmaker, then rock a formal facial hairdo like so.

Wondrous Whiskers

George Frederic Watts | Art History Staches | Art History Beards and Mustaches | No Shave November | Artists Network

Portrait of Thomas Carlyle by George Frederic Watts, oil on canvas, circa 1868

Can you picture it: ol’ Thomas looking in the mirror, a small pair of scissors in hand as he trims his sideburns and tailors the edges of his beard? The grooming is worth it because the final look is straight up class.

Soulful Stache

Rembrandt | Art History Staches | Art History Beards and Mustaches | No Shave November | Artists Network

Self-Portrait by Rembrandt van Rijn, oil on canvas, 1669. (Photo by VCG Wilson/Corbis via Getty Images)

Because who doesn’t love a good soul patch — especially one accompanied by a curls-for-the-girls mustache? Now it is crystal clear why Rembrandt van Rijn loved making so many self-portraits. With locks like that, wouldn’t you?

Beautiful Bristles

William Merritt Chase | Art History Staches | Art History Beards and Mustaches | No Shave November | Artists Network

Self-Portrait by William Merritt Chase

And to conclude this list in true bewhiskered fashion, feast your eyes on this self-portrait of our facial hair-loving friend: William Merritt Chase! I just want to stache this one away in my pocket for later. (Get it?)


Which one of these famous art hair-story examples is your favorite? Tell us in the comments!

And, be sure to check out the facial hair of our very own modern-day favorite, Johannes Vloothuis, in his video workshop series streaming now on Artists Network TV.

The post No Shave November: Hirsute Art History Edition appeared first on Artist's Network.

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Published by

maxmallie

I am obsessed with water colours and have been painting since I could hold my first brush, I have a huge passion for my own work and others, I love to teach and inspeier others. I'm a very proud Dad with 3 girls and amazing wife who shares my passion for painting.

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