Drawing Magazine, Fall 2015 Table of Contents

The fall issue of Drawing is hot off the presses, and as usual it’s loaded with artistic advice and inspiration. The issue focuses on the human body, with inspiring figure drawings from both Old Masters and a wide variety of contemporary artists. Other articles focus on choosing the write paper, drawing ellipses, and the role of artists in World War II.

Click to purchase your copy, to download the digital edition, or to subscribe to the magazine.

Drawing Magazine | NorthLightShop.com

Feature Articles

Drawing People
Inside an international survey of contemporary figure drawing. Interview by Austin R. Williams

More Than Human
The red-chalk drawings of Andrea del Sarto stand as one of the great achievements of the Renaissance. By Jerry N. Weiss
Click here to read more about this exhibition.

Drawing Fundamentals: Drawing the Head in Red and White Chalk
A detailed demonstration of a classical process for drawing the head. By Jon deMartin

Sketches of War
A new book tells how a group of artists took their skills to the front lines in World War II. By John A. Parks

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Making Dummy Land Mines, by George Vander Sluis, 1943, ink. Photo: Jeff Vander Sluis. From the book “The Ghost Army.”

Figures of Chaos
Bruce Samuelson uses a spontaneous process to create his fractured spaces and ambiguous forms. By Austin R. Williams
Click here to see an online gallery of work by Bruce Samuelson.

samuelsonfiguredrawing4

Untitled, by Bruce Samuelson, 2013, pastel and charcoal on rag board, 18 1/2 x 22.

Columns

Material World: Paper Pushers
By Sherry Camhy

First Marks: How to Draw Ellipses
By Margaret Davidson

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by Margaret Davidson. Illustration for “How to Draw Ellipses.”

New and Notable: Joel Daniel Phillips
By Michael Woodson
Click to see a bonus gallery of portrait drawings by Joel Daniel Phillips.

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Online Gallery: Portrait Drawings by Joel Daniel Phillips

In the fall 2015 issue of Drawing magazine, we feature Joel Daniel Phillips as our New and Notable artist. Phillips’ life-size charcoal portrait drawings of San Franciscans embrace the subjects’ individualism. The artist shows them wearing their usual garb and in many cases holding items or props that are meaningful to them. His portrait titled, simply, G is also found on the magazine’s cover.

Here we present a larger sample of the Phillips’ work. To see more, purchase or download your copy of the new issue of Drawing, or subscribe to the magazine.

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G, by Joel Phillips, 2015, charcoal and graphite on paper, 42×94

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Theresa, by Joel Phillips, 2015, charcoal and graphite on paper, 42×94

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Ben, by Joel Phillips, 2015, charcoal and graphite on paper, 42×94

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Jack, by Joel Phillips, 2014, charcoal and graphite on paper, 42×94

drawing_fall_15_cover

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Online Gallery: Figure Drawings by Bruce Samuelson

Bruce Samuelson, one of the featured artists in the fall issue of Drawing, specializes in a form of semi-abstracted figure drawing, with bodies arrayed in fragmented, ambiguous arrangements. He is also a longtime instructor at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Here, we’re pleased to present a sample of Samuelson’s figure drawings, accompanied by excerpts from our interview.

To read much more about Samuelson and his drawing process,  purchase or download your copy of fall Drawing, or click here to subscribe to the magazine.

samuelsonfiguredrawing1

Untitled, by Bruce Samuelson, 2009, pastel and charcoal on rag board, 24 x 19.

Drawing: How long does one of your drawings take?

Bruce Samuelson: Someone else asked me this once, and I told them it took me 40 years. It’s almost like my work is all one continuous drawing.

Usually it takes quite a while, although occasionally it could happen very quickly, within an hour. It depends in part on the medium; when I’m working with mixed media it takes longer.

 

DR: Is it important for all art students to draw from life, even if their own goals are non-objective?

BS: I always feel they can learn a great deal from drawing, regardless of where their interest is, because in the end it’s about seeing in your own way. Just because you have a figure in front of you doesn’t mean what you have on your paper has to look like it. It’s not the figure so much as nature itself. Whether it’s color, line or space, nature or the figure can inspire you without necessarily dictating to you.

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Untitled, by Bruce Samuelson, 2013, pastel and charcoal on rag board, 40 x 32.

DR: Who were some of the teachers or artists who influenced you most? 

BS: I had a lot of good teachers at the Academy. The one that stands out the most was Hobson Pittman. He taught by example—he lived as a painter, and his work was of high quality. The impressive thing about him was that nobody he taught worked like he did, at least that I ever saw. In fact, if your work did start to look like his, he would be very quick to discourage it. He emphasized the personal and unique voice of each student, and I try to do this as best I can in my own teaching.

 

DR: Are there any artists—contemporary or historical—whose work you constantly revisit or frequently share with your students? 

BS: There’s not a day in my studio I don’t look at Michelangelo in some form. But I could also be looking at Cézanne or Francis Bacon. With students, it always depends on the individual and where they’re going. Sometimes my suggestion might be the opposite of where they’re at or what they’re looking for. But you can’t go wrong with the Old Masters. And I’m always sending them after non-objective people as well, Mark Tobey for example.

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Untitled, by Bruce Samuelson, 2013, pastel and charcoal on rag board, 18 1/2 x 22.

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Untitled, by Bruce Samuelson, 2014, pastel, oil and charcoal on paper, 16 x 12.

To read more of the interview and see more of Samuelson’s artowrk, click here to get your copy of the fall 2015 issue of Drawing magazine.

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Nuts and Bolts: 9 Painting Tips for Beginners

There are many books and essays written on general painting and drawing techniques but sometimes the little practical things can make the artist’s task easier. Here are some day-to-day “nuts and bolts” painting tips for beginners.

Watercolor tips with Johannes Vloothuis | ArtistsNetwork.com

In this painting I forgot to make a provision of blank paper to indicate the running water where the rocks are in the center.

1. If you wish to correct a watercolor mistake, the easiest way is to use a spray bottle. The stream of water works like a pressure washer. To do this in a localized area, you can spray out a specific silhouette. First cover the general area with masking tape and use a utility knife to cut out the silhouette. This works specifically well for rocks or buildings. By avoiding staining colors such as Hooker’s Green or Alizarin Crimson, the aftermath of spraying out will leave almost no residue of the previous paint.

Watercolor painting tips with Johannes Vloothuis | ArtistsNetwork.com

I used the jet spray of a water bottle with an adjustable nozzle for more precise concentration of water to clean out the paint to regain the white paper.

2. If you intend to paint a risky subject, such as a portrait, there is a product called Lifting Preparation, which is to be applied before you paint. You apply this directly on the watercolor paper. This leaves a protective film between the paper and pigment. Then you can spray off the paint easily and start over. It works like Scotchgard to protect fabric on furniture.

3. There is also a new product called Watercolor Ground that allows you to add a new layer of “watercolor paper.” Several layers will have to be applied before resulting in 100% opacity. You can also use this to prime another surface that isn’t watercolor paper, such as wooden boards, plastic or metallic surfaces.

4. There’s only one way to keep your paper from buckling. Mount it pre-soaked on a Guerrilla Watercolor board. The metal clasps pull the paper every inch and fasten 100% of the four sides, leaving no margin for buckling.

5. There is relatively new product called Pan Pastels. You can paint over an overworked area, and even shift the color. The neat thing about this is that the addition isn’t even noticeable because the dust particles are very small.

6. To have better control of wet-into-wet painting, before you apply the paint, squeeze the paintbrush bristles with your thumb and index finger at the ferrule with a damp cloth so it sucks out the excess water.

7. Experiment doing a complete painting wet-into-wet. In order to keep your paper damp enough for a long period of time, wet your paper, then place a thin towel under it that is also wet. Then go through the same procedure as if you were stretching the paper. Some of the water will evaporate but the towel underneath will not allow for total dryness. This technique works great for impressionist flowers.

8. Many artists complain about being heavy-handed, meaning they cannot easily make very thin lines. Try using paper business cards: rip them in different sizes, dip the straight sides of the cardboard into your paint and stamp the lines in. This is very handy for cracks in wooden walls or rocks, thin branches on winter trees, and barbed wire.

Watercolor painting techniques with Johannes Vloothuis | ArtistsNetwork.com

You can see subtle indications of sun rays behind and next to the last building at the right.

9. To indicate sun rays in a cloudy sky for you can use an ink eraser with a ruler and erase them paint, revealing “sun rays.” This will not remove that much paint, just enough to see the subtle sun rays.

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Drawing Art: Moved by War

Ever been jealous of those artists who always walk away with all the blue ribbons and lucrative commissions? What formulas would take your work from blah to brilliant?

Just three words: Methods, Materials and Muse.

We all have creative ideas, but getting them on paper is another story. Click here to sign up for my FREE webinar, November 10, at 1:00 EST, where I’ll reveal Masters’ Methods and Materials from numerous Home Study Courses for drawing that have transformed absolute amateurs into amazing artists. (Can’t attend live? Sign up for a link to the replay.) Bonus: All of my online drawing courses are included in a Black Friday SALE during the webinar.

How to draw cats, by Sandra Angelo | ArtistsNetwork.com

Sandra Angelo explains Masters’ Methods, Materials & Ways to Access Your Muse

My History in Africa and How I Connected With Rescued Animals in Afghanistan

A vulnerable 12-year-old, at a remote boarding school in the deep jungles of Africa, my life was in eminent danger. Rebel Congolese soldiers had slaughtered my neighbor in front of his horrified 18-year-old son, and nearby missionary villages had been ransacked in murderous rampages. Word came over the shortwave radio. We were next.

In the dead of night, the US dispatched UN mercenary soldiers to sneak us through inky black jungles, to the safety of Rift Valley Academy, a boarding school in Kenya. That dangerous journey etched my heart with a deep admiration for courageous soldiers, and many years later, the following story awakened that muse.

War and Peace: Using Art to Make a Difference for Rescued Animals

In desolate deserts of war-torn Afghanistan, inhumane locals use stray dogs for sport. The dogs are beaten until they fight and pit them against each another, slashing off ears and tails, so the dogs have nothing to grasp, and the brutal fight is prolonged.

A Royal Marine, Pen Farthing stumbled onto a savage fight on his first day in Nowzad, Afghanistan. Demanding an instant halt to the brutality, Pen chased off local tyrants and the dogs scattered. Little did Pen know, this one act of kindness would revolutionize his world.

The next day, Pen was rumbling around in a sweltering shed when he spotted a quivering, injured dog cowering in the corner. With gentle persuasion and a lot of food rations, Pen slowly won the dog’s trust and dubbed his new friend Nowzad.

In charge of morale for beleaguered troops, Pen bolstered soldiers through grueling days, where they watched in horror as their buddies suffered. Being at the top, there was no one to comfort Pen, except his new chum Nowzad, so when it was time for Pen to ship out, there was no way he could leave his buddy behind. But military rules disallow pets in the first place, and they certainly weren’t going to permit Pen to take the dog home. How to draw dogs, with Sandra Angelo | ArtistsNetwork.com

Bolstered by loyalty, Pen cleverly navigated massive red tape, and after gargantuan efforts, finally got his dog to safety in the UK. Realizing that other soldiers were facing the same dilemma, Pen founded an animal shelter in Afghanistan (Nowzad.com) where soldiers can leave pets they’ve rescued, until funds are raised to fly them to safety. So far 700+ cats and dogs have been reunited with soldiers in countries all over the world, winning Pen CNN’s Hero of the Year.

When I stumbled onto the stories of the Nowzad animal shelter, my childhood loyalty to soldiers was awakened and my muse was compelled to help. Using drawing methods I’ll share in the upcoming webinar November 10, I depicted a soldier on black, to represent war’s darkness. Then I colored the puppy, to illuminate the peace a puppy brings. Eager to draw more, I fired off an email to the Nowzad shelter asking if I could write two graphite and colored pencil lesson books that teach how to draw dogs and cats and the soldiers who love them. I wanted to raise funds for these soldiers and repay the kindness I experienced in Africa.

My apprentices caught wind of the project and contributed drawings from touching photos of soldiers and the beloved pets that helped them survive.

If you’d like to take a quantum leap like my apprentices, from boring, blah art, to brilliant masterpieces click here to sign up for my FREE webinar: What Masters Do that Amateurs Don’t, on November 10. Who knows . . . Maybe at the next art show, your drawing will be the star of the show.

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Joanne Last Gallery | Abstract Pastel Landscapes

British artist Joanne Last was brought up in a creative environment. Her parents and sister are artists. Like the rest of the family, she has painted all her life, and she revels in the challenge of doing something new and breaking away from traditional methods and thinking. “As someone who’s happiest being inventive and breaking what others consider to be ‘the rules,’ I’m aware that I’m still learning how to get the most out of my pastels. I’m always trying to find different ways to use them,” she says.

 

Enjoy this gallery of remembered and abstracted pastel landscapes below, and read more about Joanne Last in the December issue of Pastel Journal—available now at northlightshop.com and on newsstands beginning November 10.

 

Don’t miss a single issue of Pastel Journal! Get your cost-savings subscription—and a FREE gift—here.

 

 

 

Reflections (pastel on board, 22x27) by Joanne Last | abstract pastel landscapes

Reflections (pastel on board, 22×27) by Joanne Last

 

 

 

Abstract With Red (pastel, 8x16) by Joanne Last | abstract pastel

Abstract With Red (pastel, 8×16) by Joanne Last

 

 

 

Kew Gardens (pastel on board, 14x14) by Joanne Last | pastel landscapes

Kew Gardens (pastel on board, 14×14) by Joanne Last

 

 

 

Putney Bridge (pastel and mixed media on paper, 8x16) by Joanne Last | pastel landscapes

Putney Bridge (pastel and mixed media on paper, 8×16) by Joanne Last

 

 

 

Reflections 2 (pastel on board, 22x27) by Joanne Last | abstract pastel landscapes

Reflections 2 (pastel on board, 22×27) by Joanne Last

 

 

 


MORE RESOURCES FOR PASTEL ARTISTS

Subscribe to Pastel Journal magazine

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Get unlimited access to over 100 art instruction ebooks

Online seminars for fine artists

Find pastel painting downloads, books, videos and more

Sign up for your Artists Network email newsletter and receive a FREE download

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Pastel Artists to Watch 2015

In the December 2015 issue of Pastel Journal, you’ll find introductions to seven artists whose latest work in pastel demonstrates a level of skill and expression that caught the attention of critiquing artists (from ProArtCritique and Pastel Journal) at the 2015 International Association of Pastel Societies (IAPS) in Albuquerque last June.

Here, you can see an example of pastel work by each of the promising talents. For more, check out the latest issue for more paintings, quick tips and commentary from the critiquing artists, including celebrated painters Desmond O’Hagan, Richard McKinley, Sally Strand and more.

 

Sunlit Ridge (pastel) by Lynda Conley

Sunlit Ridge (pastel) by Lynda Conley

Spanish Point (pastel) by Kathryn Gentile

Spanish Point (pastel) by Kathryn Gentile

The Beginning (pastel) by Eileen Casey

The Beginning (pastel) by Eileen Casey

Early Morning Field (pastel) by Audrey Dulmes

Early Morning Field (pastel) by Audrey Dulmes

 

Quest (pastel, 10x16) by Margaret Larlham

Quest (pastel, 10×16) by Margaret Larlham

Day's Bounty (pastel) by Charles Peer

Day’s Bounty (pastel) by Charles Peer

Mill Pond (pastel) by Enid Wood

Mill Pond (pastel) by Enid Wood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MORE RESOURCES FOR PASTEL ARTISTS

Subscribe to Pastel Journal magazine

Watch pastel art workshops on demand at ArtistsNetwork.TV

Get unlimited access to over 100 art instruction ebooks

Online seminars for fine artists

Find pastel painting downloads, books, videos and more

Sign up for your Artists Network email newsletter and receive a FREE download

The post Pastel Artists to Watch 2015 appeared first on Artist's Network.